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Friday, August 13, 2010

Retro Gone Wild

Let’s face it; life isn’t always “peachy keen,” even though we’d like it to be. I didn’t get my second illustration finished, but I did get a drawing on the panel that is really “spiffy.” So if you’re not too “hotsy totsy,” you can take a peek.


Compare it to the original below. In my opinion, it’s the “cat’s meow!” My own rendition will have a new twist when it’s finished. The song title: “Yes, Sir! That’s my Baby” is one of the most famous Tin Pan Alley songs by writer Walter Donaldson, the Dutch American composer and Gus Kahn, the Jewish American lyricist. The song was written at the height of the Charleston craze.


Speaking of the Charleston, here’s a YouTube link for a wonderful glimpse of that era:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=3svvCj4yhYc&feature=related 

The Ukulele was one of the most popular instruments of the day. Here are links you may enjoy to hear that instrument.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Ximt9RT9S0s

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=a6gcG3t-RI4&feature=related



Slang of the day:
  • If you thought someone was cute and sexy, you’d call the guys a “sheik” and the gals a “sheba.”
  • Feeling creepy or nervous? “I’ve got the heebie-jeebies” or “He gives me the heebie-jeebies.”
  • Prohibition bashers who got into speakeasies only had to say: “Joe Sent me.” They added their own twist on slang words with these gems: “You’re screwy!” “That’s lousy!” and you’re “all wet” pal.
  • A person of importance was a “big cheese.” A bore was a “flat tire. An easy touch was a “pushover.”
  • Jalopies were called “struggle buggies”…Creates a visual, doesn't it?
  • Hooch was the illegal drink of the day. And those 1920s hair “dooos” were bobbed.
Come back next week for more 1920s nostalgia. I hope you’re having fun! Below is another link to “Flapper Fashions.”
http://www.fashion-era.com/flapper_fashion_1920s.htm